sharing my passion for classic and heirloom sewing

Then I placed one heat-safe plastic snap at the top of the back closure. 

I used one strand DMC embroidery floss for the hand-embroidery work. The lace-shaping was placed on top of the fabric and I didn't cut away the behind fabric. 

I closed the back by creating a placket-like situation out of the fabric from the dress (ie I didn't add a strip as done with the continuous placket method).  If I could redo this, I would omit the stitched X at the bottom of the placket. 

I love how sweet entredeux makes a garment look. Sure it takes another minute or two to complete each seam, but it really adds to the garment. 

I hand sewed English netting to the bottom of the dress.

Finally, I shaped some silk-ribbon into a bow and hand sewed that down.

The Old Fashioned Baby Daydresses pattern is a super easy dress to put together. It also is quite flexible in its fit and should fit your child for more than just a month or so. The dress is really only fitted around the neckline and armhole area, so as your baby's tummy and such grows, it doesn't matter with this outfit. 


I made the white version out of white Nelona batiste and embellished with some lace-shaping, entredeux, and hand embroidery. 

Here is another version of this pattern made from some gorgeous Silk Dupioni. Audrey wore this for some family photos around Christmas time. 

I also made this green velvet version without sleeves and instead finished the edge with bias strip.